Why Intersectionality Can’t Wait, by Kimberlé Crenshaw in the Washington Post (from September 2015)

“Mere words won’t change the way that some people — the less-visible members of political constituencies — must continue to wait for leaders, decision-makers and others to see their struggles. In the context of addressing the racial disparities that still plague our nation, activists and stakeholders must raise awareness about the intersectional dimensions of racial injustice that must be addressed to enhance the lives of all youths of color.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/in-theory/wp/2015/09/24/why-intersectionality-cant-wait/?postshare=7221484008066786&tid=ss_fb&utm_term=.ce6173fde449

 

Racism, Chinese Restaurants, and Immigration in Early-20th Century US

Fascinating story on the history and proliferation of Chinese restaurants in the United States, and their link to immigration and limitations on immigration.

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2016/02/22/467113401/lo-mein-loophole-how-u-s-immigration-law-fueled-a-chinese-restaurant-boom?utm_content=buffer5925e&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

NPR: “When Ancestry Search Led To Escaped Slave: ‘All I Could Do Was Weep'”

“When she was in fifth grade, Regina Mason received a school assignment that would change her life: to connect with her country of origin. That night, she went home and asked her mother where they were from.

“She told me about her grandfather who was a former slave,” Mason tells Fresh Air’s Terry Gross. “And that blew me away, because I’m thinking, ‘Slavery was like biblical times. It wasn’t just a few generations removed.’ ”

http://www.npr.org/2016/01/18/463164866/when-ancestry-search-led-to-escaped-slave-all-i-could-do-was-weep