Race in America – Charts that Illustrate Where We Are

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/02/civil-rights-act-anniversary-racism-charts_n_5521104.html

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White supremacy’s long shadow: Why the myth of “race” still haunts America by JACQUELINE JONES

In an excerpt of her new book, “A Dreadful Deceit: The Myth of Race From the Colonial Era to Obama’s America,”  Jacqueline Jones describes how, “decades removed from the lows of segregation, black America still struggles against its twisted logic.”

http://www.salon.com/2013/12/15/white_supremacys_long_shadow_why_the_myth_of_race_still_haunts_america/

September 15 – A Day of Remembrance

In Alabama, 1963 was a year of confrontations and violence. Tomorrow, we remember not just four girls who were killed at the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church on September 15, 1963,, but others killed and injured in the Civil Rights Movement. This link shares the story of two boys, Virgil Ware and Johnny Robinson, who were killed the same day.

http://blog.al.com/spotnews/2013/09/virgil_ware_and_johnny_robinso.html#incart_river_default

The Unfinished Business of the 1963 March on Washington from the Economic Policy Institute

This infographic compares 1963 to 2012, illustrating how much further there is to go…

http://www.epi.org/multimedia/infographic-unfinished-business-1963-march/

A Majority of Black Americans Feel They’re Treated Unfairly by Just About Every Major Civic Institution by EMILY BADGER, The Atlantic Cities

“With the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s“I Have a Dream” speech approaching next week, Pewreleased today a new survey on public perception of the progress blacks have made in America since then. The top-level finding is unsurprising: African-Americans are much more pessimistic than whites are in rating the extent to which they still face inequality and unfairness in American society. And they’re significantly more likely to say that a lot of work still needs to be done.”

http://www.theatlanticcities.com/neighborhoods/2013/08/majority-black-americans-feel-theyre-treated-unfairly-just-about-every-major-civic-institution/6636/

To Join ’63 March On Washington: ‘Like Climbing A Mountain’ by Michelle Norris

There are many anniversaries from the Civil Rights Movement this year, including the March on Washington.

For the Month of August, Morning Edition and The Race Card Project are looking back at a seminal moment in civil rights history: The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., delivered his iconic “I Have A Dream Speech” on Aug. 28, 1963. Approximately 250,000 people descended on the nation’s capitol from all over the country for the mass demonstration.”

http://www.npr.org/2013/08/05/207913707/to-join-63-march-on-washington-like-climbing-a-mountain