“How a Blond American Kid Became a Huge Star In Saudi Arabia” Washington Post

December 16
 “Say the name Joshua Van Alstine in Saudi Arabia and the likely response is a blank stare.

But mention his Web-born persona, Abu Muteb, and chances are good that you will get a knowing nod or a wry smile for the baby-faced American military brat. He slings Saudi­accented Arabic, wears traditional Arabian robes, mixes comedy and commentary, and may be one of the Arab world’s most improbable celebrities.”

 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/middle_east/how-a-blond-american-kid-became-a-huge-star-in-saudi-arabia/2015/12/15/9d614a36-a2bf-11e5-8318-bd8caed8c588_story.html?tid=sm_fb

“Walk a Mile in Her Hijab”

High Schoolers in Illinois experienced what it is like for their Mulsim peers who wear hijab.

 

Video: http://www.dailyherald.com/article/20151210/news/151219957/#autoplay

http://www.dailyherald.com/article/20151210/news/151219957/

http://www.dailyherald.com/article/20151216/news/151219092/

  • An article about the responses to the article and event.

 

 

63 Black Harvard Students Share Their Experiences In A Powerful Photo Project

“The “I, Too, Am Harvard” photo campaign explores the diverse experience that black students at Harvard have to face.”

This happens everywhere, but these students share their experiences and their messages to others:

http://www.buzzfeed.com/alisonvingiano/21-black-harvard-students-share-their-experiences-through-a

Stereotypes Influence Perceptions of Race and the Statistics Kept about Them – NPR

“Governments, schools and companies keep track of your race. The statistics are used to track the proportion of blacks and whites who graduate from school. They tell us how many people identify themselves as Native American or Asian. They help us measure health disparities. But there’s a problem with all those statistics — and the deeper way we think about race.”

http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2014/02/11/275087586/study-stereotypes-drive-perceptions-of-race